We’re all spending a lot more time at home these days. Between remote work, e-learning, video exercise classes and more, it’s beginning to feel like our homes are our whole world. Residential builders and developers are taking notice of this, and consequently the home of the future may look a little different than it does today.

A recent survey of builders from Meyers Research found that the most popular design change homeowners are considering is adding more dedicated office space or work stations in their home. Close behind that is a desire for more flex space and e-learning space for kids. Since homes are now also serving as schools and workplaces for the foreseeable future, these modifications could greatly increase the productivity and functionality of a home.

According to Sam Cochran, Architectural Digest’s Features Director, open floor plans may also soon be a thing of the past. As he told Cheddar, people may be feeling a greater need for privacy away from family and roommates, and traditional floorplans that maximize the use of space throughout a home may be more desirable in the future.

Some builders are also now including more health-related features in new homes, including touchless faucets, bacteria-resistant paint and air filters. While the demand for dedicated e-learning space in a home may soon fade, the pandemic could have a long-lasting impact in how people prioritize their health when at home.

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